John Kennedy

Male 1769 - 1855  (86 years)


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  • Name John Kennedy 
    Born 4 Jul 1769  Knocknalling, Kells, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Gender Male 
    Census 1841  Ardwick Hall, Ardwick, Manchester Find all individuals with events at this location 
    independent means, age 72, head 
    Died 30 Oct 1855  Ardwick Hall, Ardwick, Manchester Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Buried Rusholme Road cemetery, Ardwick, Manchester Find all individuals with events at this location 
    Person ID I7485  Brooksbank
    Last Modified 7 Jul 2012 

    Father Robert Kennedy, of Knocknalling,   b. 1730, Knocknalling, Kells, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 12 May 1779, Stewartry, Scotland Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 49 years) 
    Mother Margaret Alexander,   b. 1728,   d. 17 Dec 1801  (Age 73 years) 
    Family ID F3025  Group Sheet

    Spouse Mary Stuart,   b. 1781, Manchester Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. Yes, date unknown 
    Children 
     1. John Lawson Kennedy, MA, JP, DL,   b. 5 Dec 1814, Tadcaster, Yorkshire Find all individuals with events at this location,   d. 5 May 1895, Whalley Range, Manchester Find all individuals with events at this location  (Age 80 years)
    Last Modified 8 Oct 2011 
    Family ID F3024  Group Sheet

  • Event Map Click to display
    Link to Google MapsCensus - independent means, age 72, head - 1841 - Ardwick Hall, Ardwick, Manchester Link to Google Earth
    Link to Google MapsDied - 30 Oct 1855 - Ardwick Hall, Ardwick, Manchester Link to Google Earth
     = Link to Google Maps 
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  • Photos
    John Kennedy pen portrait
    John Kennedy pen portrait

  • Notes 
    • Written by John Kennedy in 1849:
      "When I was about 11 years old, Adam Murray went to England as an apprentice to Mr. William Cannan of Chowbent, who was himself originally from the parish of Kells, and had learnt his trade of carpenter... I arrived at Chowbent on Sunday February 8th, 1784 and commenced working for Messrs. Cannan and James Smith... My indentures were for seven years -that is until I was twenty-one years of age for my meat and clothing, and I was to live in the house with Mr. Cannan... Shortly before I left home, Paul jones invaded the coast of Galloway, and there was a great cry of the dangers of Popery being introduced; for about the same time Lord George Gordon's riots had taken place in London, on an attempt to gain an extension of the privileges of Catholics."
      "My masters had made a carding engine and spinning jenny(of Hargreaves's) for this place, and Mr. Smith had to stop to gate and trim them. One was put up in a small house, the other in a small room, for there was no mills there then. This was the first thing in the way of cotton spinning I had ever seen or heard of."
      "I came to Manchester on the 13th or 14th of February 1791. I there formed a partnership with Benjamin and William Sandford, who were fustian warehousemen, and James McConnel , under the firm of Sanfords, McConnel, and Kennedy; and we immediately commenced business as machine-makers and mule spinners: I taking the direction of the machine department."
      "At the time when I married your mother in 1804, I was living in Ancoats lane, in a house next to the Rochdale Canal bridge, where we continued to reside until 1806, when we removed to Medlock. In 1822 we came to Ardwick where we have lived as you know ever since."
    • (Research):see http://goo.gl/woXki also http://goo.gl/SfvGb
      KENNEDY, JOHN (1769\endash 1855), cotton-spinner and inventor, third son of Robert Kennedy, was born at Knocknalling, Kirkcudbrightshire, on 4 July 1769. He was educated at the village school of Dalry, and he also had the advantage of an occasional tutor during the winter months. He lost his father early, and at the age of fourteen was sent by his mother to Chowbent, Lancashire, and apprenticed to William Cannan, the son of a neighbour, who had established himself there as a machine-maker. The machinery made at that time was limited to carding-frames, Hargreaves's jennies, and Arkwright's water-frames, all employed in cotton-manufacture. At the end of his apprenticeship in February 1791 he removed to Manchester, as partner with Benjamin and William Sandford and James m'Connel, machine-makers and mule-spinners, and the firm for many years were the sole makers of Crompton's 'mule.' Kennedy introduced several ingenious improvements for the spinning of fine yarns, including the 'jack frame.' As a spinner he was successful, and realised a considerable fortune. He was a friend of James Watt and many other scientific men of his day, and was a cordial supporter of every improvement in mechanical science. He was an active member of the Manchester Literary and Philosophical Society, which he joined in 1803, and contributed four papers to its 'Memoirs:' 1. 'On the Rise and Progress of the Cotton Trade,' 1815. 2. 'On the Poor Laws,' 1819. 3. 'Observations on the Influence of Machinery on the Working Classes,' 1826. 4. 'Memoir of Samuel Crompton,' 1830. These papers he reprinted for private circulation in 1849, with an appendix containing autobiographical particulars of his early life, and notes of a tour on the continent.
      He married Mary, daughter of John Stuart of Manchester, and died at Ardwick Hall, Manchester, on 30 Oct. 1855, aged 86, leaving one son, John Lawson Kennedy, and several daughters, and was buried at Rusholme Road cemetery, Ardwick, Manchester.